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theatlantic:

The Original Hooligans

Dating back to at least the 1880s, the word “hooligan” was actually the name of a family of cartoon characters who, during the 1890s, frequently graced the cover of the English comic literary journal Nuggets – “A Serio-Comic Budget of Pictures & Stories.” The Hooligans were a family of Irish immigrants living in London, but not quite fitting in. Drawn by T.S. Baker and captioned with thick Irish accents, the Hooligan family typically displays odd and buffoonish behavior that’s juxtaposed against the properness of English culture.

Read more. [Images: The Visual Telling of Stories]

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    When the Irish weren’t so white… Origins of the word “hooligan.”
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